The Larrinaga family: from Mundaka to Liverpool

This post introduces the second of the Anglo-Basque merchant families whose trans-imperial networks are at the heart of the Imperial Entanglements project: the Larrinaga family of Mundaka and Liverpool. Early in 1861, a young Basque couple arrived at Ann Jones’s boarding house in Liverpool’s St Paul’s Square. Ramón de Larrinaga, aged 28, was a master … Continue reading The Larrinaga family: from Mundaka to Liverpool

“Co-Dependent Empires”

Having wrapped up the first Imperial Entanglements workshop, the project members are now looking ahead to next year's conference and the conference theme. Having spent the past year thinking, researching, and writing about the entanglements and encounters between Spanish and British citizens across the two empires, I was left trying to explain why the interactions … Continue reading “Co-Dependent Empires”

Workshop Wrap Up: “News Then and News Now”

The entanglements of the British and Spanish empires from the 17th to the 19th centuries spanned most littoral areas of the globe and touched on all aspects of society. From the abhorrent supply of African slaves by British citizens to Cuba, to the less well known feud over tea and fur trading monopolies in the … Continue reading Workshop Wrap Up: “News Then and News Now”

MERCHANT CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE SOUTH AMERICAN PACIFIC COAST, SPAIN, AND BRITAIN, 1750-1830: SOURCES, PROBLEMS, AND QUESTIONS

Editor's note: Imperial Entanglements is hosting a one day workshop at Warwick University called "News Then and News Now: Imperial Entanglements and Transoceanic Networks in Anglo-Spanish Colonialism and their Legacy". The programme and all other information can be found here: Imperial Entanglements Workshop 2017 In the next few weeks the blog will be featuring posts/previews … Continue reading MERCHANT CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN THE SOUTH AMERICAN PACIFIC COAST, SPAIN, AND BRITAIN, 1750-1830: SOURCES, PROBLEMS, AND QUESTIONS

‘To all practical purposes a British merchant’: Pedro José de Zulueta and his family in 1843

1843 was not a good summer for the young Anglo-Basque merchant Pedro de Zulueta. As we learned in three previous entries on this blog (entry 1; entry 2; entry 3), one quiet August morning, having just arrived at his office ‘which [was] situated in the most conspicuous spot in the City of London’ (ix), he … Continue reading ‘To all practical purposes a British merchant’: Pedro José de Zulueta and his family in 1843